Jobs – What’s Hot and What’s Not!

There are global forces of change that are and will affect businesses and the resulting job market over the next 40 years including: a global balance of power shift from West to East and North to South; resources and practices are protected (not open to all); increased connectedness due to tech with instant global communities; earth with changing climate/fewer natural resources; move to transparency (social media where your business is everybody’s business); and a shift and focus on values with the decline of blind consumerism.

The Hot List  

What’s key to sustained employment? People skills that machines can’t copy (e.g. during the second week in February 2014, it was reported that Facebook had more than 170 sales related positions open, which was almost twice as many openings as software engineers). Recently, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) updated a report where it expects the most job growth by 2022 (see Tables 1.3). Top 10 areas for expansion include two that are customer facing: retail sales and customer service, as well as four health-care sectors in which basic people skills such as empathy are critical.

People with skills that are in demand will be appreciated by the market. The rub is that many of these skilled positions are in areas where companies are already experiencing a shortage of qualified labor: technology, health care and other key sectors. Locally, we have observed increases in hiring for the following: sales, logistics, and staffing part-time positions, call centers, manufacturing, construction, biomedical engineer, pharmacy, long-term care, and home care.

The Not List

The U.S. job market will not be better for everyone, with labor-market disruptions brought on by new technologies; self-driving cars, robotics, online commerce, and transfer of jobs overseas. The BLS also updated its report for the fields where it expects the most decline by 2022 (see Table 1.5). Nationally, for tree-fellers, shoemakers, and postal clerks, 30 percent of these jobs may disappear. Locally, the gaming jobs that were lost during the recession have not returned, and although construction growth has been strong, we are not at the numbers of jobs represented before 2009.

Employers, take a look at your strategic planning including flexibility in your vision given global trends and how you will leverage them to your advantage, and be willing to train, mentor, and create the learning environment needed for the skills sets you require.

Employees, be flexible about your career choices and assumptions given the global trends; be willing to have training; be open to a mentor so you can always be “teachable”; and embrace the learning environment needed for the skills sets your desired job requires.

Written by Jim Annis, President/CEO of The Applied Companies, which provide HR solutions for today’s workplace. Celeste Johnson, Tom Miller, and Suzanne Chennault, Applied’s division directors, contributed to this article.

Table 1.3 Fastest growing occupations, 2012 and projected 2022
(Numbers in thousands)

2012 National Employment Matrix title and code

Employment

Change, 2012—22

Median annual wage, 2012 (1)

2012

2022

Number

Percent

Total, All Occupations

00-0000

145,355.8

160,983.7

15,628.0

10.8

$34,750

Industrial-organizational psychologists

19-3032

1.6

2.5

0.9

53.4

$83,580

Personal care aides

39-9021

1,190.6

1,771.4

580.8

48.8

$19,910

Home health aides

31-1011

875.1

1,299.3

424.2

48.5

$20,820

Insulation workers, mechanical

47-2132

28.9

42.4

13.5

46.7

$39,170

Interpreters and translators

27-3091

63.6

92.9

29.3

46.1

$45,430

Diagnostic medical sonographers

29-2032

58.8

85.9

27.0

46.0

$65,860

Helpers–brickmasons, blockmasons, stonemasons, and tile and marble setters

47-3011

24.4

34.9

10.5

43.0

$28,220

Occupational therapy assistants

31-2011

30.3

43.2

12.9

42.6

$53,240

Genetic counselors

29-9092

2.1

3.0

0.9

41.2

$56,800

Physical therapist assistants

31-2021

71.4

100.7

29.3

41.0

$52,160

Physical therapist aides

31-2022

50.0

70.1

20.1

40.1

$23,880

Skincare specialists

39-5094

44.4

62.0

17.7

39.8

$28,640

Physician assistants

29-1071

86.7

120.0

33.3

38.4

$90,930

Segmental pavers

47-4091

1.8

2.4

0.7

38.1

$33,720

Helpers–electricians

47-3013

60.8

83.3

22.4

36.9

$27,670

Information security analysts

15-1122

75.1

102.5

27.4

36.5

$86,170

Occupational therapy aides

31-2012

8.4

11.4

3.0

36.2

$26,850

Health specialties teachers, postsecondary

25-1071

190.0

258.6

68.6

36.1

$81,140

Medical secretaries

43-6013

525.6

714.9

189.2

36.0

$31,350

Physical therapists

29-1123

204.2

277.7

73.5

36.0

$79,860

Orthotists and prosthetists

29-2091

8.5

11.5

3.0

35.5

$62,670

Brickmasons and blockmasons

47-2021

71.0

96.2

25.2

35.5

$46,440

Nursing instructors and teachers, postsecondary

25-1072

67.8

91.8

24.0

35.4

$64,850

Nurse practitioners

29-1171

110.2

147.3

37.1

33.7

$89,960

Audiologists

29-1181

13.0

17.3

4.3

33.6

$69,720

Dental hygienists

29-2021

192.8

256.9

64.2

33.3

$70,210

Meeting, convention, and event planners

13-1121

94.2

125.4

31.3

33.2

$45,810

Therapists, all other

29-1129

28.8

37.9

9.1

31.7

$53,210

Market research analysts and marketing specialists

13-1161

415.7

547.2

131.5

31.6

$60,300

Substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors

21-1011

89.6

117.7

28.2

31.4

$38,520

Footnotes:
1 Data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics program, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.Source: Employment Projections program, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

 

Table 1.5 Fastest declining occupations, 2012 and projected 2022
(Numbers in thousands)

2012 National Employment Matrix title and code

Employment

Change, 2012—22

Median annual wage, 2012 (1)

2012

2022

Number

Percent

Total, All Occupations

00-0000

145,355.8

160,983.7

15,628.0

10.8

$34,750

Fallers

45-4021

6.6

3.8

-2.9

-43.3

$35,250

Locomotive firers

53-4012

1.6

0.9

-0.7

-42.0

$44,920

Shoe machine operators and tenders

51-6042

3.5

2.3

-1.2

-35.3

$24,310

Postal service clerks

43-5051

66.9

45.7

-21.3

-31.8

$53,090

Log graders and scalers

45-4023

3.5

2.4

-1.1

-31.6

$32,880

Postal service mail sorters, processors, and processing machine operators

43-5053

129.6

91.0

-38.6

-29.8

$53,090

Semiconductor processors

51-9141

21.3

15.5

-5.8

-27.1

$33,020

Textile cutting machine setters, operators, and tenders

51-6062

15.5

11.3

-4.2

-27.1

$24,050

Postal service mail carriers

43-5052

295.1

215.8

-79.2

-26.8

$56,490

Motion picture projectionists

39-3021

8.0

5.8

-2.1

-26.5

$19,830

Sewing machine operators

51-6031

161.4

119.7

-41.7

-25.8

$21,270

Word processors and typists

43-9022

104.4

78.2

-26.2

-25.1

$35,270

Fabric and apparel patternmakers

51-6092

6.5

4.9

-1.6

-25.0

$38,650

Data entry keyers

43-9021

220.3

166.1

-54.2

-24.6

$28,010

Textile knitting and weaving machine setters, operators, and tenders

51-6063

21.9

16.5

-5.4

-24.5

$26,540

Postmasters and mail superintendents

11-9131

23.0

17.4

-5.6

-24.2

$63,050

Textile bleaching and dyeing machine operators and tenders

51-6061

11.4

8.6

-2.7

-24.0

$24,210

Animal breeders

45-2021

1.3

1.0

-0.3

-23.4

$34,250

Drilling and boring machine tool setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic

51-4032

20.9

16.2

-4.7

-22.5

$33,940

Textile winding, twisting, and drawing out machine setters, operators, and tenders

51-6064

27.5

21.8

-5.6

-20.5

$25,850

Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers

11-9013

930.6

750.7

-179.9

-19.3

$69,300

Meter readers, utilities

43-5041

40.2

32.5

-7.7

-19.2

$35,940

Pourers and casters, metal

51-4052

10.7

8.7

-2.0

-18.7

$34,060

Computer operators

43-9011

74.6

62.0

-12.7

-17.0

$38,390

Foundry mold and coremakers

51-4071

12.4

10.4

-2.0

-16.2

$30,540

Extruding and drawing machine setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic

51-4021

74.9

63.0

-11.9

-15.9

$32,330

Molding, coremaking, and casting machine setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic

51-4072

125.0

105.8

-19.2

-15.4

$28,630

Door-to-door sales workers, news and street vendors, and related workers

41-9091

92.7

78.5

-14.2

-15.3

$21,470

Cutters and trimmers, hand

51-9031

14.2

12.1

-2.2

-15.3

$24,530

Manufactured building and mobile home installers

49-9095

5.3

4.5

-0.8

-15.1

$28,080

Footnotes:
1 Data are from the Occupational Employment Statistics program, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.Source: Employment Projections program, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics