Improve Your Chances of Staying Employed

There is a plethora of advice on how to find a job. How to put together a great résumé, perform a killer interview, and network properly. What if you are employed and concerned about keeping your job when so many have been laid off? Every employer is different; however, there are some common rules of conduct that companies across the nation appreciate.  Applied Staffing Solutions (www.appliedstaffing.com) offers you the following guidelines to Improve Your Chances of Staying Employed:

 

BE FLEXIBLE

            Never say “That’s not my job.”

                      Companies are operating with less people doing more work. Your ability to adapt to the

                      company’s needs in a timely manner will provide an invaluable service to your employer.   

Be cautious about turning down new assignments.

            Accommodate your employer’s requests. If your “plate is full” ask for a meeting to prioritize the

           work. Your manager may help you reorganize your schedule or pass low priority items to

           a coworker who is looking for an opportunity to grow.

 

BE ACCOUNTABLE

            You are hired to perform a job.

                        Refuse to list excuses when you can’t deliver results. Admit it and take responsibility when you

                        fall short of goals. Exert yourself to succeed with the plan you and your manager design to 

                        correct deficiencies. Neglecting your responsibilities is carelessness – repeatedly not doing or not

                        completing your job can be seen as laziness.

            Be cautious about using the refrain “I’m doing the best I can.”

                        Like the boy who cried wolf, that line only goes so far. Eventually you have to step up to the

                        plate and perform well. Follow through and avoid recurring mistakes.

 

BE PRODUCTIVE

            Generate results.

                        Meet and exceed the expectations of your job. Anticipate employer’s needs and provide the

                        information they need before being asked. Pitch in when your team is shorthanded due to illness

                        or vacations. Be a “go to person” that smiles and goes the extra mile. 

            Be cautious about inferior behavior.

                        Too many absences, being late, texting or making personal phone calls on the job, and requiring

                        constant positive reinforcement to be productive can try the patience of any employer. A lack of

                        initiative and an inability to learn or adapt to working conditions creates inefficiency.

 

BE A COMMUNICATOR

            Ask questions.

                        Make sure you understand your job thoroughly by asking questions – you are gathering

                        information to do your work properly. Listen carefully and take notes. At a later date, if you must

                        seek clarification, prepare a written list of questions to keep the interface on topic and brief.

                        Know your employer’s communication style – do they like a lot of information with constant

                        updates or do they prefer concise reports only as needed. 

            Be cautious about how and what you communicate.

                        Always emailing/texting information or updates to coworkers and your employer breaks down

                        personal connections. Much of the time face-to-face interaction can solve problems quicker than

                        relying on technology. Negative comments regarding your company or coworkers exhibits

                        disloyalty, is an on-the-job time waster, and creates an unhealthy work environment.